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Some Great Cover Tunes

June 11, 2009

When it comes to musicians, there are probably none more authentic than The Beatles and Johnny Cash.  Different genres for sure, but their music is timeless.

Every now and again a newer band will cover one of these timeless pieces of music and put their own spin on the song.  Such is the case for two songs that I’d like to share with you the reader.


Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” is a song by The Beatles originally released on the double-disc album The Beatles (also known as The White Album), and later released as a single. It is mostly written by Paul McCartney, though credited to Lennon/McCartney. (see the wikipedia entry here).  It’s a darn catchy tune, made even catchier by House of Heroes, who do a phenomenal cover of the song.


House of Heroes is an alternative rock band from Columbus, Ohio. They are generally considered to be Christian rock, though their lyrics are not always transparently Christian.[1] They have released four albums: What You Want Is Now (2003), House of Heroes (2005), Say No More (2006), and The End Is Not the End (2008) and House of Heroes Meets The Beatles (2009). (wikipedia)

Man in Black” (or “The Man in Black“) is a protest song written and sung by and about Johnny Cash, originally released on his 1971 album of the same name. Cash himself was known as “The Man in Black” for his distinctive style of on-stage costuming. The lyrics are an after-the-fact explanation of this with the entire song as a protest statement with statements such as:

I wear the black for the poor and the beaten down, Livin’ in the hopeless, hungry side of town,
I wear it for the prisoner who has long paid for his crime, But is there because he’s a victim of the times. (wikipedia)

One Bad Pig is a Christian punk and metal crossover band from Austin, Texas which formed in 1985. The Encyclopedia of Contemporary Christian Music describes them as “Quite possibly the most popular hard-punk act ever to arise within the Christian music scene.”[1] They were known for their mischief and irreverence on-stage, as reflected even in their reunion at Cornerstone in 2000. (wikipedia)


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